Banner
Third Non-Browning Arctic Apple Approved By USDA

The third non-browning Arctic apple variety - yes, using science - the Arctic Fuji, has been approved...

Ground Squirrels Use The Sun To Hide Food

Jamie Samson and Marta Manser from the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental 1Studies...

Alzheimer's Beginnings Prove To Be A Sticky Situation

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Laser technology has revealed a common trait of Alzheimer's disease - a...

Saying Sorry Not Enough When Trust, Gender Roles Broken, Just Ask Clinton And Trump

TORONTO, September 12, 2016 - Public figures such as United States presidential candidates Hilary...

User picture.
News StaffRSS Feed of this column.

News Releases From All Over The World, Right To You... Read More »

Blogroll

Bacteria didn't just impact our evolution, we impacted the evolution of bacteria also, according to a study of DNA preserved in calcified bacteria on the teeth of ancient human skeletons.

The ancient genetic record reveals the negative changes in oral bacteria brought about by the dietary shifts as humans became farmers, and later with the introduction of food manufacturing in the Industrial Revolution.


Despite being in use for almost 20 years with no health or safety issues, controversy continues to surround genetically modified crops and their regulation.

Bruce Chassy, a professor emeritus of food science and human nutrition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, believes that after thousands of research studies and worldwide planting, "genetically modified foods pose no special risks to consumers or the environment" and are over-regulated.


Engineers from the University at Buffalo engineers have created technology that could lead to breakthroughs in solar energy, stealth technology and other areas - but they had to catch some rainbows first. 

Qiaoqiang Gan, PhD, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at  the University at Buffalo, and a team of graduate students developed a "hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide," which is essentially an advanced microchip made of alternate ultra-thin films of metal and semiconductors and/or insulators. The waveguide halts and ultimately absorbs each frequency of light, at slightly different places in a vertical direction  to catch a "rainbow" of wavelengths.  


Offshore wind has potential to help the United States meet its growing energy needs, but the U.S. marine renewable energy industry has lagged behind Europe for decades.

Recent government subsidies have accelerated renewable energy development in U.S. waters, particularly along the East Coast, but a critical challenge is finding space for a growing number of turbines in an ocean crowded with fishing, marine transportation and recreational boating.


Why is the world so full of "morons" and "degenerates" and what, if anything, can be done to fix them?

These are questions that Robert W. Sussman, PhD, a professor of anthropology in Arts&Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, explored Feb. 15th at the AAAS meeting in Boston.


Recognition of early-career women scientists helps encourage participation in medical research, builds strong research cultures, and inspires a new generation of scientists.

 In that light, five medical and life science researchers from Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean Basin today received the 2013 Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World for work that could contribute to life-saving knowledge and therapies worldwide. The prizes were awarded by The Elsevier Foundation, the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World and TWAS, the academy of sciences for the developing world, to build research capacity and advance scientific knowledge throughout the developing world.