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Ancient DNA Study Finds Phoenician From Carthage Had European Ancestry

A research team co-led by a scientist at New Zealand's University of Otago has sequenced the first...

Female Meerkats Compete To Outgrow Their Sisters

Meerkats live in groups of up to 50 individuals, yet a single dominant pair will almost completely...

Scientists Discover How Supermassive Black Holes Keep Galaxies Turned Off

An international team of scientists has identified a common phenomenon in galaxies that could explain...

Out Of Tune: Mismatch Of Vascular And Neural Responses Suggests Limits Of FMRI

In an article published online ahead of print on May 25, 2016 in Nature, investigators at the...

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ONO-4641, an investigational oral drug, reduced the number of lesions in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to the results of a phase two clinical trial to be presented this week at the American Academy of Neurology Meeting in New Orleans.
Tattoos and body piercings are so ubiquitous in western societies that they are more cliché than  edgy, but social scientists in France say they may be more than fashion trends - they may be harbingers of doom. Individuals who get them  are also more likely to engage in risky behaviors that include substance and alcohol use. 
The second-largest mass extinction in Earth's history, the so-called Late Ordovician mass extinction, coincided with a short but intense ice age during which enormous glaciers grew and sea levels dropped.

The Late Ordovician mass extinction occurred about 450 million years ago and was related to climate change, that has been known, but exactly how the climate change produced the extinction has not. A team led by scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has created a framework for weighing the factors that might have led to mass extinction and has used that framework to determine that the majority of extinctions were caused by habitat loss due to falling sea levels and cooling of the tropical oceans.
In a development that would be bad for the U.S. Department of Energy but good for solar power worldwide, a new process developed by scientists at the University of Cambridge has the potential to drive down the cost of manufacturing solar-grade silicon and boost use of photovoltaic devices.
Widely accepted theories of dark matter,  a mysterious invisible substance that can only be detected indirectly by the gravitational force it exerts, expect the solar neighborhood to be filled with the stuff - but it isn't, at least as far as can be detected.

Don't get too excited but 200 activists are going to jump off Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

These aren't the usual pesky environmentalists, these are hang-gliding global activists, which really sounds like just an excuse to go hang-gliding but get permits to do it in cool places but it's still going to raise money for a worthy cause.