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Many Women Buy Products Because Models Are Thin, But There's A Market For Normal

Fashion is a huge industry and they use thin models because creating an ideal - the belief that...

Photogrammetry: Of Viking Graves And Sunken Ships

Mapping archaeological digs used to take plenty of time and a lot of measuring, photographing,...

Smaller Volumes In Certain Regions Of The Brain Could Lead To Increased Likelihood Of Drug Addiction

A study has found that individual differences in brain structure could help to determine the risk...

New Gene Implicated In Multiple Sclerosis Disease Activity

A new study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) reports the discovery of...

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Infants who receive the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) following the combination vaccine for diphtheria, polio, tetanus, pertussis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DPTaP-Hib vaccine) appear to experience less pain than those who are immunized in the opposite order, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of Pediatrics&Adolescent Medicine, a theme issue on vaccines. 

Injections are the most painful common medical procedure conducted in childhood, according to background information in the article.
Children who were consistently victimized by peers were more likely to develop psychotic symptoms in early adolescence, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

Some psychosis-like symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions are commonly experienced in childhood and even adulthood, according to background information in the article, though children with these symptoms are at increased risk of developing psychosis in adulthood.

So did bullying cause the psychosis or were the kids bullied because they had psychotic symptoms?
Science and engineering are advancing rapidly in part due to ever more powerful computer simulations, yet the most advanced supercomputers require programming skills that all too few U.S. researchers possess. At the same time, affordable computers and committed national programs outside the U.S. are eroding American competitiveness in number of simulation-driven fields, according to findings in the International Assessment of Research and Development in Simulation-Based Engineering and Science, released on Apr. 22, 2009, by the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC).

Like other WTEC studies, this study was led by a team of leading researchers from a range of simulation science and engineering disciplines and involved site visits to research facilities around the world.
It sounds like it should be a New York Times headline - "Tobacco kills everyone!  Women impacted most!"  but, no, females may actually be more vulnerable than men to the cancer-causing effects of smoking tobacco, according to new results reported this week at the European Multidisciplinary Conference in Thoracic Oncology (EMCTO), Lugano, Switzerland.   The good news (if there can be good news about lung cancer) is that women tend to do better than men after lung cancer surgery.

Swiss researchers studied 683 lung cancer patients who were referred to a cancer centre in St Gallen between 2000 and 2005 and found women tended to be younger when they developed the cancer, despite having smoked on average significantly less than men.
Women live longer than men but it may not be a great life.   In a study that included 5,888 people over 65, women suffered up to two and a half times more disabilities than men of the same age and the higher rates of obesity and arthritis among these women explained up to 48 percent of the gender gap in disability – above all other common chronic health conditions. 

Obesity and arthritis that take root during early and middle age significantly contribute to women's decreased quality of life during their senior years, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.
What happened in the first trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second after the Big Bang?  Super-sensitive microwave detectors, built at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), may soon help scientists find out.

The new sensors, described today at the American Physical Society (APS) meeting in Denver, were made for a potentially ground-breaking experiment by a collaboration involving NIST, Princeton University, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the University of Chicago.