Physics

Part 1, which begins our examination of the question 'what is time?' can be viewed here.
Part 2 Some travels through time can be viewed  here.
Part 3 discussing language, sequence and order, can be viewed  here.
Part 4 a brief discussion of clocks, Steno, Foucault and Allais, can be viewed here.

Note: this blog on time is speculative, not established fact.
Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a new ion trap that enables ions to go through an intersection while keeping their cool. Ten million times cooler than in prior similar trips, in fact.

The demonstration described in Physical Review Letters is a step toward scaling up trap technology to build a large-scale quantum computer using ions (electrically charged atoms), a potentially powerful machine that could perform certain calculations—such as breaking today’s best data encryption codes—much faster than today’s computers.
A team of astronomers, led by Dr. Bo Wang from the Yunnan Observatory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have developed a new model which explains the formation of the most youthful type Ia supernovae. In a paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Dr. Bo Wang and his team show how the transfer of material from a ‘helium star’ to a compact white dwarf companion causes these cataclysmic events to take place early on in the life of the galaxy they formed in.

When is a Metal not a metal?  At high pressure, of course!

Part 1, which begins our examination of the question 'what is time?' can be viewed here.
Part 2 Some travels through time can be viewed  here.
Part 3 discussing language, sequence and order, can be viewed  here.

A Theory of Time Part 4 : Steno, Foucault and Allais



What, at the Most Fundamental Level, is a Clock?
Cornell scientists have applied genetic programming to experimental data in order to elicit fundamental physical laws governing the data.  These physical laws include Lagrangians and laws relating to momentum conservation.  The article is available here.  This is a triumph for genetic computing.  If one imagines the evolution of scientific discovery in human lifetime terms, the ability to speed this process via evolutionary simulation is quite interesting.  However, these types of algorithms can never replace human inspiration and creativity in developing theoretical models.  
Part 1, which begins our examination of the question 'what is time?' can be viewed here.
Part 2 Some travels through time can be viewed  here.
A proposed discussion of Foucault's pendulum has been postponed to a later part of this blog series.

A Theory of Time

Interlude
Part 1, which begins our examination of the question 'what is time?' can be viewed here.
Part 2 Some travels through time.


This is a slightly whimsical interlude, presented as a break from the 'hard' stuff.

The first part of what follows is a speculation about a journey back through time. 
At some point in this fiction-science journey, fact begins to creep in.

"the end of our exploring,
Will be to arrive where we started,
And know the place for the first time."
TS Eliot, 'Little Gidding'

A Brief Journey Through Time
If physicists lived in Flatland—the fictional two-dimensional world invented by Edwin Abbott in his 1884 novel—some of their quantum physics experiments would turn out differently (not just thinner) than those in our world.

The distinction has taken another step from speculative fiction to real-world puzzle with a paper from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) reporting on a Flatland arrangement of ultracold gas atoms. The new results, which don’t quite jibe with earlier Flatland experiments in Paris, might help clarify a strange property: “superfluidity.”
A Theory of Time - Part One

The problem of time is recognised as
a problem in physics.

What is Time?