Physics

The NEUTEL 2011 conference started today in Venice. Many experiments in neutrino physics will be reporting new results there, and the interest is of course high in the community. Along with a few vailant physicists from my university, I will be blogging form the site, trying to cover all the important new information as well as some other information in general. So please visit the NEUTEL11 blog to learn the latest news on neutrino physics... Already there is a report on a general overview of neutrino oscillations by Art McDonald, among with additional posts on HEP results.
Researchers say they have ruled  the cosmic bubble theory, an alternate theory on the nature of dark energy, after recalculating the expansion rate of the universe to unprecedented accuracy.

The universe appears to be expanding at an increasing rate and some believe that is because the universe is filled with a dark energy that works in the opposite way of gravity. One alternative to that hypothesis is that an enormous bubble of relatively empty space eight billion light-years across surrounds our galactic neighborhood. If we lived near the center of this void, observations of galaxies being pushed away from each other at accelerating speeds would be an illusion.
Third graders enjoy clay and pipe cleaners. It might sound cruel to teach them graduate level graph theory most math Ph.D.’s have not seen, but I might get away with it if I uses the right craft supplies. Tell kids spinach is good for them. Children are right to skeptical, as I expect of my reader.

[The video is a reading of the content contained herein, so click or skip]




... Not really.

What startled me most was that a colleague of mine at the University of Padova even sent a message to my departments' mailing list, saying that the new result is very important. But it clearly isn't! In fact, the exclusion at 95% CL in the range of Higgs boson masses that CDF and DZERO could put together from the analysis of additional data is almost exactly the same as the one that they published last Summer.

But maybe I should make a step back and explain the matter from the start, to let you judge by yourself the relevance of the new Tevatron bounds on the rate of Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions.

CDF and DZERO are analyzing the proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV that the Tevatron collider is producing since 2001.

Neutrino phyisics may be boring, as Jester claims in a post today at the NEUTEL11 blog, or exciting, as many others are ready to testify. And since Jester talks about exciting new results ready to be submitted by the XENON100 collaboration, I would bet you will concur with the latter.
I define the fringe as anyone trying to make a contribution to a field where they are not employed or do not have a degree in the subject.  I happen to be a fringe physicist because my degrees from MIT were in Biology and Chemical Engineering.  My current job is in software with no connection what-so-ever with physics.

Readers of this blog know that I often discuss here the latest results of searches of Supersymmetric (SUSY) particles -nowadays furthered by the CDF and DZERO experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN LHC.

Upon expressing the Higgs potential in terms of the field H0, we find



The first term in V is a constant energy density which can be interpreted as a contribution to the vacuum energy,


Superfluid liquid Helium is shot under very high pressure out of a tiny nozzle and into vacuum. Outside in front of the nozzle, the excess pressure bursts the liquid apart violently into a myriad of fragments. A cloud of ultra small droplets comes into existence. The liquid beam is almost completely atomized.

If you take a randomly drawn droplet from the explosion, the number of atoms inside of it is mostly just one, a single atom. Finding two atoms is less likely, three atoms even less, and so on.

Booze has likely inspired many an action in researchers but any actual science effect was second order.   No more.   Scientists from the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan found that immersing pellets of an iron-based compound in heated alcoholic beverages for 24 hours greatly increase their superconducting ability.

And red wine, which has been shown to have numerous health benefits, is apparently tops in physics experiments as well.