Physics

Two weeks have passed since the CERN Jamboree of December 15th, which will be always remembered for the spurious 750 GeV signal observed by ATLAS and CMS in their mass spectra of photon pairs. It is unfortunate, as dozens of very important new measurements and search results were shown by the experiments on that occasion, but they all got overshadowed by a fluctuation.
Here is my holiday card for 2015, a tradition of mine going back to 1990.  Enjoy.






On the back...



I also include a summary of the year.  Here is the stuff on my research efforts:

Hello:

[The article below is courtesy  Eilam Gross. Eilam is a physicist from the ATLAS experiment and has been convener of the Higgs group there. I am very happy to host a guest post from him on the exciting topic below...]


Marumi Kado started his talk by saying he will only present new results based on the full 2015 13 TeV pp collision dataset.
For Run 2 there have been a large number of improvements to the detector.

Also the trigger has been improved, with a new central trigger processor. Reconstruction software also was improved significantly. 

Marumi spent a long time describing the retuning of the detector and the performance in reconstruction of impact parameters, physics objects, and the like. The physics modellinghas been verified in several control samples of dibosons, top pairs, etcetera.

Marumi shows that the Higgs signals in ATLAS are wanting. 0.7 sigma observed in 4-lepton mode, expected 2.8 sigma. Similar story in diphotons.
Jim Olsen is giving the CMS talk on 13 TeV results. CMS recorded 90% of the 4 inverse femtobarns delivered by the LHC, but only 2.8/fb were taken with the magnet at 3.8 Tesla (for the rest of the time the magnet was off due to a problem with the helium purity).
A plot of the dimuon invariant mass of 60,000,000 events collected by dimuon triggers was shown, which is a pleasure to watch. I will attach it here later.

CMS has 18 new searches for beyond-the-standard model effects. For objects with masses above 1 TeV the sensitivity of 2.2/fb of analyzed data may be larger than the sensitivity of 2012 data.

The diboson bump at 2 TeV is almost completely ruled out; so is the edge signal of SUSY that was seen in run 1 (a 2.6 sigma excess back then).

As most of you already know, today at 3PM two back-to-back talks by Jim Olsen (CMS) and Marumi Kado (ATLAS) at CERN will disclose the latest results of physics analyses performed on 13 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded this year by the two experiments. (To follow the talks see here).

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     The Standard Model

Tomorrow at 2PM two back-to-back talks by Jim Olsen and Marumi Kado at CERN will disclose the newest results of the CMS and ATLAS experiments, which will be based on the analysis of 2.5 to 4 inverse femtobarns of 13 TeV proton-proton collisions acquired by the experiments this year.
Why should you be interested ? Of course, because the year could end with a boom! Maybe the experiments have found evidence for something totally unexpected in their data. After all, 13 TeV is 63% more energy than 8 TeV. 
When we look out at the universe – even with the most powerful of telescopes – we can only see a fraction of the matter we know must be there. In fact, for every gram’s worth of atoms in the universe, there is at least five times more invisible material called “dark matter”. So far scientists have failed to detect it, despite spending decades searching.

The reason we know it exists is because of the gravitational pull of galaxy clusters and other phenomena we observe.

In this blog, I challenge the vaulted role that tensor calculus enjoys today. I will define a concrete example of what I consider to be a technical flaw in the tools of tensor calculus in all modern physics theories. The complaint is about completeness, that partial stories are not good enough. Please feel free to defend the status quo in the comments.


The relativistic quantum field equation for a spin 0 particle is the Klein-Gordon equation (written in natural units):




One takes the first derivative of the wave function. Also take three spatial derivatives. Then take the second time derivative of the wave function, and similarly for the three spatial derivatives.