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    Confirmed for WCSJ 2009
    By Tommaso Dorigo | April 15th 2009 06:05 AM | 24 comments | Print | E-mail | Track Comments
    About Tommaso

    I am an experimental particle physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN. In my spare time I play chess, abuse the piano, and aim my dobson...

    View Tommaso's Profile
    This short post is my first contribution to ScientificBlogging: with it I am relocating my blog here from wordpress. I am thrilled by the opportunity to join a larger group of excellent science writers, and possibly reach a larger audience interested in particle physics and in my other occasional discussions of chess, politics, astronomy, astrophysics, or the personal notes I sometimes choose  to dump here.

    It was with relief that last evening I finally received a confirmation of my talk from the organizers of the 2009 World Conference on Science Journalists, an event which will take place in London from June 29th to July 3rd, striving to "bring established and aspiring reporters, writers and science communicators from around the world to debate, network, develop their professional skills and report on the latest advances in science and technology".

    I had been invited to attend the works of WCSJ2009 six months ago by Jon Turney, the producer of session 22, "Blogs, big physics and breaking news", but I had not since received the go-ahead for my registration, nor instructions on whether I would get funded to attend: the passing deadlines for registration and accommodation had left me with a feeling of uncertainty. This is now over, and I have proceeded this morning to arrange my travel details. Incidentally, I will bring with me my 10 year old son Filippo, who is understandably enthusiastic of the chance to visit London.

    The session summary reads as follows:

    How are blogs changing the way science news develops and is reported?
    The commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will offer a
    telling case study over the next few years. Who will be first with news
    of the fabled Higgs Boson, and how will we know if they're right?
    I have to say, this is just my bread and butter. I think I will definitely have something non-trivial to say on the matter, possibly basing my talk on a couple of past examples of how scientific news on Higgs boson searches -back then at the Tevatron- have made it to popularization magazines and newspapers, and how one could have figured out whether to get excited by those news or not. The fact that the diffusion of the information stirred some controversy within the originating experiments is only adding some spice to the package.

    I look forward to submitting here a draft of my presentation in mid-June, to give you a chance to suggest improvements or just comment on the material. And I will of course be blogging from the conference, in case I stumble on anything worth reporting...

    Comments

    Wow! Well, good luck and I'm sure we'll still follow you over here.

    dorigo
    Thank you Kea, I am delighted you are the very first to comment on my new site!
    Cheers,
    T.
    Kimberly Crandell
    Welcome, Tommaso!  I envy you and your son's upcoming trip to London.  I look forward to your updates regarding WCSJ - and all your future articles here on ScientificBlogging.
    dorigo
    Thank you Kimberly for your warm welcome! And beautiful avatar pic - I have a similar one with my 6yo daughter which I've been using for facebook for a while, and I was about to use that one here, but in the end I decided that would be too much change for today!

    Cheers,
    T.
    Kimberly Crandell
    Just FYI... ScientificBlogging has a Facebook page too.  You can make use of your father/daughter avatar by joining us over there.  :)
    dorigo
    Will undoubtedly do! Only, so much to do to settle this thing now... Up for tomorrow.
    T.
    Break a leg! My, there are lot's of billboards when you drive in this neighborhood. At least we can gas up at the ol' BP petrol station on the right side of the blogk. I wonder if we'll ever see any food or beverage ads? Scientists eat and drink, too. Dont' they?

    dorigo
    Aargh Fred, the tongue beats where the tooth is aching :-) Seriously, I think ads here are pretty innocuous-looking. Sure, I do not drink gasoline for breakfast, but if you need some who am I to oppose it ? ;-)
    Cheers,
    T.
    Updated links in my blogroll.

    Enjoy the new site!

    Cheers,

    Marco

    Hi Tommaso,

    welcome to my board. I will give you many moneys for you to have fun!

    You are quite right about the signage, T.
    I confess that 90% of my income is due to producing corporate ads and such. As far as drinking gas, I am fortunate enough to ride a bike to work during the week but cancel my good deed by having to drive quite a bit on the weekends. For some reason, the HGC Diet Noodles displayed to the right seem inviting.

    dorigo
    Hi Marco, thank you!
    Hello Daniel, thanks for joining - yours and the other comments ease the psychological load of my move today!
    T.
    Hank
    I'm interested in this conference.  As you know, this sort of thing is near and dear to us also.   At the AAAS conference in August, I am holding a 3 hour symposium on science communication and we have some real luminaries talking (and then me - ha ha) but I had never heard about this in London.   Maybe they don't get people from this side of the pond?
    dorigo
    Highly interesting stuff at the AAAS Hank. As for the London conference, it looks to me a pretty big event too, certainly international, but maybe I am biased by being accustomed to the elitist particle physics conferences...
    Cheers,
    T.
    logicman
    maybe I am biased by being accustomed to the elitist particle physics conferences...

    Hi, Tommaso, and welcome.

    I need to keep up more with science news.  I had no idea that the elitist particle had been discovered.  Let me guess: all spin and no substance.  :)
    dorigo
    Aww Patrick, thanks, but teach me English rather than shooting at me. Or rather, well. Shooting is ok, I learn quite fast that way too ;-)

    Cheers,
    T.
    new RRS feed = zero dollars
    new bookmark = zero dollars
    new phyics site = zero dollars
    the partical physics you shared with us over the last 40 months at QDS ,and previously with QD, and what i have learned through your writing, i truly can't put a price on it. Thank You
    Tommaso at first,finding out that you were moving to Scientific Blogging did come as a surprise.
    however you have shown me the value of unexpected surprises to the fields of research science.
    i am looking forward to the many more surprises you will introduce us too like,Higgs no Higgs ?
    or the challenges of Supersymmetry research.
    i like your new home Tommaso .

    dorigo
    Well John, this is a quite welcome note from you.  As I mentioned elsewhere, progress and evolution usually happen with change, typically a discontinuity. So let it be with this site.

    Please look forward to many more hopefully informative posts. I am working at my first real article here as we speak...

    Cheers,
    T.
    jolek
    Hi Tommaso. Good luck for your new blog!
    (new?) :-)
    dorigo
    Thanks for stopping by Fabio!
    T.
    Hi Tommaso, I just changed my RSS feed subscription over to your new blog location, but it seems that the new RSS feed only delivers the first paragraph of your articles! Sadly, this means that I probably won't be reading as much of your posts as I used to, as I dislike being forced to open my web browser unnecessarily. I hope that this is just a teething problem that will be sorted out soon... :)

    dorigo
    Hello Mike,

    I think this will not change, because of a policy of the administrators. We will see though.

    Cheers,
    T.
    Hank
    Mike,

    Even when we were smaller we had an issue with less reputable sites leeching content.   I would get alarmed emails from prominent writers asking why their content was appearing on some weird site even though writers here retain copyright.    Full feeds just makes it too easy and we need to make sure your names are protected and not associated with some crazy site a person might throw up and make it look like you are writing there.

    Partial feeds at least make that a lot more difficult.   If someone knows of a way to do full feeds that can't be easily stolen, we'd do it.   

    Hopefully Tommaso will be worth opening up a web browser.  I think he is!   :)

    Hank
    Hank, Tommaso,

    Thanks for the replies.

    The whole purpose of RSS is to syndicate the stories, so having "full feeds that can't be easily stolen" is a bit of a contradiction (although "stolen" isn't a particularly useful word here). I've always found that the benefits of making the whole entry available by RSS outweigh the downsides. Ideally, anyone reusing the content should make it clear that they are just reproducing it, not associating themselves with it, and in my experience the best way of dealing with problematic cases is to first write to the site owners and then to their ISPs if you don't get anywhere.

    I'll certainly continue reading, but will probably only read past the first paragraph of the entries that particularly interest me, rather than the majority of them as I've done before.

    Mike