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Is The Tungsten Bulb On Its Way Back?

In the last few days, there has been a spate of reports that the incandescent bulb is on its way...

Ancient Greek attitudes today

The Ancient Greeks (Archimedes being an honourable exception) have a reputation for having been...

Jubilee Plastic Bag

A day or two ago, local ITV featured a news item about a man who had kept the same plastic bulk...

Ancient Nitrogen Metabolsim

We are often told how bad it is to keep sitting at the computer, but one good outcome at least...

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Robert H OlleyRSS Feed of this column.

Until recently, I worked in the Polymer Physics Group of the Physics Department at the University of Reading.

I would describe myself as a Polymer Morphologist. I am not an astronaut,

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Once again, your resident tellytraveller has turned his gaze to the Southern Hemisphere, this time with second series of Coast Australia.  Episode 8 took us to New South Wales, and most spectacularly to Jervis Bay, a little under 200 km south of Sydney.


VE, VF ...?

VE, VF ...?

May 13 2015 | 3 comment(s)

Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of one of the most famous speeches given by Winston Churchill:

We shall fight on the beaches


of which the best remembered words are

We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, ...

Fish and flowers inspire diving goggle material


says an article in Chemistry World

First, the fish.  Fish repel oil by trapping water within their scales to create a self-cleaning, oil-repellent coat.

And in the other corner, this little flower, Diphylleia grayi, – also known as the skeleton flower – which has the property that when rained on, its petals turn transparent, becoming white again on drying out.

Recently on Real Clear Science, Ross Pomeroy published an article Why Nothing Can Be Truly ‘Unnatural’, in which he denounces attempts to oppose homosexuality on scientific grounds.  However, after reading it, I am left with the feeling that he is not simply reporting science, but perhaps being a little bit like an old-fashioned nanny telling her charges what is or is not proper.  If so, he will be firing a shot in