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Robert H OlleyRSS Feed of this column.

Until recently, I worked in the Polymer Physics Group of the Physics Department at the University of Reading.

I would describe myself as a Polymer Morphologist. I am not an astronaut,

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Yesterday (8th) I took this photograph of Venus and Mercury from the grounds of Reading University.
In the photograph, Mercury is about two moon-breadths down and to the right of Venus.  Over the next two days Mercury will follow the arrow relative to the much brighter Venus, moving up and closer to Venus, and then move off to the right.
For folks in the USA, you should get a slightly better view as the angles will be tilted a few degrees clockwise, and near the Equator the two planets will appear to sit directly over the brightest part of the sky where the sun is directly below the horizon.

Good viewing!

A news release from Heidelberg, In Search of the Origin of Our Brain, treats us to these two pictures:

Will the medicines you take make their way back into your food?  They might, especially of you take your cue from an old Yorkshire song which deals with human recycling in the food chain, via worms and ducks.  Now, research [1] from the university of York (where else?) has studied one step of this process in detail.

We have over the years read of paintings by chimpanzees, but could they be art critics also?

A recent article has appeared, outlining evidence that many cognitive tasks the we take to be a function of our human intelligence can be performed just as well (or even better) by chimpanzees.  Here are links to two versions of the article:

We’ve been having a lot of interesting items here on Science 2.0 coming from an Anglo-Oz joint venture called The Conversation,.  One that struck me most forcibly has been Masculinity And Terror: The Missing Conversation, linked to a paper When Ba