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It's Time For Racism In College Admissions To Go

The Shackled Man hypothesis rightly notes that if two people are running a race, and one has leg...

I Don't Use The Term 'Miracle' Very Often, But...

This isn't the Dr. Oz show or some nutrition site selling Vitamin D supplements or whatever the...

New York Bans Fracking, Prepares To Buy More Energy From Fracking

What do wealthy progressives in New York and California share in common? Both groups are happy...

Congress Adopts A Common-Sense Approach To The California Drought

As I wrote in California Government Is The Big Water Management Problem, we can't make it...

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Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0®.

A wise man once said Darwin had the greatest idea anyone ever had. Others may prefer Newton or Archimedes. Probably no one ever said the WWW or Science... Read More »

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I like to use the Sneetches With Stars analogy (I did so again two days ago) because Theodor Seuss Geisel, famously known as Dr. Seuss, was spot on with the idea that humans would find a reason to be different from one another. In the Sneetch community, when one group had a star, they were superior, and eventually a savvy businessman came along and found a way to give everyone stars (which was delightfully both capitalism and communism, kind of like Science 2.0 is) and then, as predicted, when everyone now had a star the group who originally had stars but had claimed it was just nature that they were superior, bought star removal for themselves.
The U.S. educational system clearly produces some of the best minds in the world.

America leads in science output and in adult science literacy, yet when it comes to standardized tests, the United States has always been in the middle of the pack and that has long been a concern.

Proper clinical research exposure in medical school is a somewhat modern invention. Prior to changes implemented by Harvard Medical School in the 19th century, medicine was more application-focused, but gradually medical schools began to expose students to basic and clinical research. By the 20th century it was the norm that doctors would have a foundation in research and physician-scientists were their teachers.


To many practitioners of yoga in the United States, its original form would be unrecognizable in everything but the name. What was once about spirituality is now about health and physical fitness. 

If you are going to be a guru in the US, one tenet of yoga remains from the past - go with the flow. As the medical claims of yoga became more prevalent and yoga catapulted into a $10-billion-a-year enterprise, practitioners embraced new marketing success or fell by the wayside. Sanskrit names for postures and religious "om"-ing are out, 'feeling the burn' is in. 
Periodically I get invited to talk about science and food on the nationwide AgriTalk radio program, hosted by Mike Adams - not the Natural News guy,  this is the one who likes farmers.

Joining me today was Roxi Beck of the Center for Food Integrity. You're all used to me so what I say may not be anything new, but Beck made terrific points, namely that even as people are supportive of technology in their phones, they may not want it in their bodies - even with modern medicine adding 30 years to human life expectancy in the last century. 
On today's "Dr. Oz" television show, Dr. Mehmet Oz finally addressed what has worried some and infuriated others about his media career; the show addressed the possibility that a gifted medical professional with too many awards to count had gone off the alternative medicine deep end.