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"Food Evolution": A Tale Of Two Cities

Last night was the premiere of "Food Evolution", a documentary on the science in our dinner...

Are New Government Guidelines For Genetically Engineered Products Going Far Enough?

Since 2014, China has spent $4 billion on advanced agricultural science and is approving new technologies...

The Bizarre Relationship Between Environmental Lawyer Stephen Tillery And A Federal Judge Who Helped Him

Attorney Patrick Murphy is representing infamous sue-and-settle environmental lawyer Stephen Tillery...

Alan Alda's Art And Science Of Relating And Communicating

You are about to hear a huge sigh of relief from the entire science journalism community, because...

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Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0® in 2006 and, since June of 2015, the President of the American Council on Science and Health.

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KFC is launching a 5-in-1 meal with a built in power bank so you can charge your phone while you eat lunch. Watt a Box is designed to offset the drop in discretionary spend brought on by the moribund economy. One way to gain a competitive advantage over other companies is to introduce a feature they don't have. And that feature is a phone that won't die during chicken.

Sorry, US diners, right now it is exclusive to Delhi and Mumbai.

For decades we have been told that salmon is good for us, for everything from heart health to brain function. And we should eat more of it.

But if more people actually listened to those dietary recommendations, they would run squarely up against environmental activists and the media outlets (i.e. Mother Jones) and anti-science Deniers for Hire (i.e. SourceWatch) they fund. 
Should your ethnicity determine whether or not you are accepted into college?

Of course not, but once upon a time it was. Half a century ago, it certainly made a difference in which schools and universities you could attend. After what was morally obvious was rightfully struck down on legal grounds, discussion then turned to how to fix the problem that remained. The "shackled man" theory holds that if two people are running a race, and one has shackles on their feet, taking the shackles off their feet 100 yards into the race does not suddenly make it fair. They deserve to make up for that lost ground.
If you paid 23andMe to take a look at your DNA, maybe you wanted to know more than why you like cilantro or are related to Genghis Khan, maybe you thought you were advancing science.

Well, you are, in the same old way marketers have long advanced science - by selling information about customers. In this case, the DNA information of 1.2 million people, sold to more than 13 drug companies. Genentech paid $10 million to look at the genes of people with Parkinson’s disease.

Now, that's good, it isn't like a Parkinson's treatment is going to come from the government, but 23andMe customers paid to have their DNA info sold to other companies. That is a sucker move.
For what seems like decades, it has been open season on scientists and corporations by environmental non-profit corporations and the PR groups they fund to be their hatchet men, like SourceWatch and Mother Jones. Libel? No problem, Lisa Graves at SourceWatch will do it. Spinning stolen funding proposals provided by a fired employee as actual conspiracy events? Mother Jones will oblige.
While watching the Stanley Cup match on Saturday, the first period ended and legendary sportscaster Bob Costas appeared on the screen with the Lexus Intermission Report.It made me chuckle seeing an overt corporate placement because the day before, a blogger at the political website Mother Jones named Tom Philpott had asked me on Twitter what I thought of a new EPA paper on the herbicide atrazine.