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Mark Bittman Can't Succeed In Food, So He'll Teach It

Mark Bittman, cookbook guru and former New York Times columnist for those who self-identify as...

Environmentalists Have Gone To Their Bunkers Over Trump

Environmentalists almost certainly cost Secretary Hillary Clinton the election and now they want...

Michael Pollan Doesn't Just Hate Agriculture, He Hates All Scientists

Michael Pollan, food activist and journalist, is the proverbial man trapped in the past in...

Cornell Students Want Their Own Kangaroo Court For GMOs

Cornell students want to "debate" GMOs tomorrow, and while finding anti-science activists is easy...

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Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0® in 2006 and, since June of 2015, the President of the American Council on Science and Health.

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KFC is launching a 5-in-1 meal with a built in power bank so you can charge your phone while you eat lunch. Watt a Box is designed to offset the drop in discretionary spend brought on by the moribund economy. One way to gain a competitive advantage over other companies is to introduce a feature they don't have. And that feature is a phone that won't die during chicken.

Sorry, US diners, right now it is exclusive to Delhi and Mumbai.

For decades we have been told that salmon is good for us, for everything from heart health to brain function. And we should eat more of it.

But if more people actually listened to those dietary recommendations, they would run squarely up against environmental activists and the media outlets (i.e. Mother Jones) and anti-science Deniers for Hire (i.e. SourceWatch) they fund. 
Should your ethnicity determine whether or not you are accepted into college?

Of course not, but once upon a time it was. Half a century ago, it certainly made a difference in which schools and universities you could attend. After what was morally obvious was rightfully struck down on legal grounds, discussion then turned to how to fix the problem that remained. The "shackled man" theory holds that if two people are running a race, and one has shackles on their feet, taking the shackles off their feet 100 yards into the race does not suddenly make it fair. They deserve to make up for that lost ground.
If you paid 23andMe to take a look at your DNA, maybe you wanted to know more than why you like cilantro or are related to Genghis Khan, maybe you thought you were advancing science.

Well, you are, in the same old way marketers have long advanced science - by selling information about customers. In this case, the DNA information of 1.2 million people, sold to more than 13 drug companies. Genentech paid $10 million to look at the genes of people with Parkinson’s disease.

Now, that's good, it isn't like a Parkinson's treatment is going to come from the government, but 23andMe customers paid to have their DNA info sold to other companies. That is a sucker move.