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Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

Tommaso Dorigo is an experimental particle physicist, who works for the INFN at the University of Padova, and collaborates with the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. He coordinates the European network... Read More »

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While I was busy reporting the talks at the "Neutrino Telescope"  conference in Venice, LHCb released a startling new result, which I have not much time to describe in much detail this evening (it's Friday evening here in Italy and I'm going to call the week off), and yet wish to share with you as soon as possible.
The spectroscopy of low- and intermediate-mass hadrons (whatever this means) is a complex topic which either enthuses particle physicists or bores them to death. There are two reasons for this dycothomic behaviour.
This is to mention several interesting articles summarizing the presentations given today at the Neutrino Telescopes conference in Venice:
Gravitational Waves: a New Era in Astrophysics Has Begun- A Neutrino Platform
- Overview of the DUNE Experiment
- Poster summary: Neutrino masses and ordering via multimessenger astronomy
The first day of the Neutrino Telescopes XVII conference in Venice is over, and I would like to point you to some short summaries that I published for the conference blog, at http://neutel11.wordpress.com. 
Specifically:


- a summary of the talk on Super-Kamiokande
- a summary of the talk on SNO
- a summary of the talk on KamLAND
- a summary of the talk on K2K and T2K
- a summary of the talk on Daya Bay

You might have noticed that the above experiments were recipients of the 2016 Breakthrough prize in physics. In fact, the session was specifically focusing on these experiments for that reason.
Elementary particles are mysterious and unfathomable, and it takes giant accelerators and incredibly complex devices to study them. In the last 100 years we have made great strides in the investigations of the properties of quarks, leptons, and vector bosons, but I would lie if I said we know half of what we would like to. In science, the opening of a door reveals others, closed by more complicated locks - and no clearer example of this is the investigation of subatomic matter. 
Decision trees are one of the many players in the booming field of supervised machine learning. They can be used to classify elements into two or more classes, depending on their characteristics. Their interest in particle physics applications is large, as we always need to try and decide on a statistical basis what kind of physics process originated the particle collision we see in our detector.
Today I would like to mention that my book "Anomaly! Collider Physics and the Quest for New Phenomena at Fermilab" is now available for purchase as E-Book at its World Scientific site.