Banner
B0 Meson Lifetime Difference Measured By ATLAS

I feel one could describe the new B-physics result by ATLAS as "stalking". A very subtle detail...

Prescaled Jet Triggers: The Rationale Of Randomly Picking Events

In a chapter of the book I have written, "Anomaly! - Collider physics and the quest for new phenomena...

Catching The 750 GeV Boson With Roman Pots ?!

I am told by a TOTEM manager that this is public news and so it can be blogged about - so here...

Scavenging LHC Data: The CMS Data Scouting Technique

With the Large Hadron Collider now finally up and running after the unfortunate weasel incident...

User picture.
picture for Hank Campbellpicture for Bente Lilja Byepicture for Sascha Vongehrpicture for Heidi Hendersonpicture for Johannes Koelmanpicture for Georg von Hippel
Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

I am an experimental particle physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN. In my spare time I play chess, abuse the piano, and aim my dobson telescope at faint galaxies.... Read More »

Blogroll
Jim Olsen is giving the CMS talk on 13 TeV results. CMS recorded 90% of the 4 inverse femtobarns delivered by the LHC, but only 2.8/fb were taken with the magnet at 3.8 Tesla (for the rest of the time the magnet was off due to a problem with the helium purity).
A plot of the dimuon invariant mass of 60,000,000 events collected by dimuon triggers was shown, which is a pleasure to watch. I will attach it here later.

CMS has 18 new searches for beyond-the-standard model effects. For objects with masses above 1 TeV the sensitivity of 2.2/fb of analyzed data may be larger than the sensitivity of 2012 data.

The diboson bump at 2 TeV is almost completely ruled out; so is the edge signal of SUSY that was seen in run 1 (a 2.6 sigma excess back then).

As most of you already know, today at 3PM two back-to-back talks by Jim Olsen (CMS) and Marumi Kado (ATLAS) at CERN will disclose the latest results of physics analyses performed on 13 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded this year by the two experiments. (To follow the talks see here).

Tomorrow at 2PM two back-to-back talks by Jim Olsen and Marumi Kado at CERN will disclose the newest results of the CMS and ATLAS experiments, which will be based on the analysis of 2.5 to 4 inverse femtobarns of 13 TeV proton-proton collisions acquired by the experiments this year.
Why should you be interested ? Of course, because the year could end with a boom! Maybe the experiments have found evidence for something totally unexpected in their data. After all, 13 TeV is 63% more energy than 8 TeV. 
Interna

Interna

Dec 10 2015 | 1 comment(s)

As I am sure happens with many other human occupations, the job of a particle physicist proceeds in bursts of activity interspersed with periods of more relative calm. Deadlines must be met, and sometimes several of them overlap. The life of a physicist can get miserable for short periods of time, but after those end one usually looks back with satisfaction at the accomplishments.
This week's graph is a reminder that particle physicists are, deep in their bones, bump hunters. Sure, some of my colleagues could best be described as detector builders; others as software wizards; still others as statistical gurus. But what excites us the most is to go hunting for a bump in a mass histogram. 
Have you recently obtained a Masters degree in a scientific discipline ? Are you fascinated by particle physics ? Do you have an interest in Machine Learning developments, artificial intelligence, and all that ? Or are you just well versed in Statistical Analysis ? Do you want to be paid twice as much as I am for attending a PhD ? If the above applies to you, you are certainly advised to read on.