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Bang! Meet The Highest-Energy Hadron Collision Ever Imaged!

The 13 TeV data from LHC collisions taken this summer is quickly going through analysis programs...

(Well)-Paid PhD Position In Physics Offered In Padova, Italy

Are you a post-lauream student in Physics, interested in pursuing a career in particle physics...

New Results From The LHC At 13 TeV!

Well, as some of you may have heard, the restart of the LHC has not been as smooth as we had hoped...

Marek Karliner: Not A Pentaquark, But A Molecule - As He And Rosner Predicted

The reported observation of a resonant state of a J/psi meson and a proton in the decay of the...

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Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

I am an experimental particle physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN. In my spare time I play chess, abuse the piano, and aim my dobson telescope at faint galaxies.... Read More »

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I am very happy today because I have been notified by the European Community that a project I submitted for funding as coordinator last January has been evaluated very positively by the EU reviewers. The project is a training network of universities and research centres in Europe, with participation of two additional academic partners and four industrial partners from the US, Russia, Italy and Belgium. The network name is "AMVA4NewPhysics", and it aims at developing and applying cutting-edge statistical learning tools to new physics and Englert-Higgs boson studies to the LHC data collected by ATLAS and CMS.

There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers.

Richard Feynman, who would turn 97 years old today. Happy birthday, mr. Feynman!

Sometimes I write stuff here not because I know things, but rather, because I would like to know more, and I think the audience of this blog may help me find the material I need to become more knowledgeable on some topic. Having a blog is a privilege, in the sense that the one-to-many communication it establishes between the writer and the readers allows the owner to sometimes have access to the (all together vast) knowledge of his or her readers. Thanks to you, dear reader, to your comments, reactions, and suggestions expressed in the comments thread, I learn more on topics I do not have an expertise on. I cherish this one-to-many communcation means and I am grateful to you for it. 
As yesterday in Italy was the equivalent of Labor Day, and today is a Saturday, with people around me exploiting the three-day rest for a recreational trip, I do not feel in a very productive mood, so rather than writing something original here I will exploit other people's work, pointing at what I found interesting or anyway worth my attention among the papers appeared on the Cornell Arxiv in the last few days, and other assorted material.
"B.W. Lee also carries much of the responsibility for calling the Higgs boson the Higgs boson, mentioning repeatedly 'Higgs scalar fields' in a review talk at the International Conference on High-Energy Physics in 1972."
J. Ellis, M.K. Gaillard, D. Nanopoulos, "An updated historical profile of the Higgs boson", arxiv:1504.07217.