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Physics-Inspired Artwork In Venice 2: Symmetries

As I explained in the previous post of this series, students in high schools of the Venice area...

Physics-Inspired Artwork In Venice 1: Sub-Lime

This is the first of a series of posts that will publish the results of artistic work by high-school...

Europe In My Region 2017

The European Commission has launched a couple of weeks ago the campaign "Europe in my region 2017"...

Guest Post: Dorigo’s Anomaly! And The Social Psychology Of Professional Discourse In Physics, By Alex Durig

Dr. Alex Durig (see picture) is a professional freelance writer, with a PhD in social psychology...

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Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

Tommaso Dorigo is an experimental particle physicist, who works for the INFN at the University of Padova, and collaborates with the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. He coordinates the European network... Read More »

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Snow is melting in the Alps, and particle physicists, who have flocked to La Thuile for exciting ski conferences in the past weeks, are now back to their usual occupations. The pressure of the deadline is over: results have been finalized and approved, preliminary conference notes have been submitted, talks have been given. The period starting now, the one immediately following presentation of new results, when the next deadline (summer conferences!) is still far away, is more productive in terms of real thought and new ideas. Hopefully we'll come up with some new way to probe the standard model or to squeeze more information from those proton-proton collisions, lest we start to look like accountants!
Where by "It" I really mean the Future of mankind. The human race is facing huge new challenges in the XXI century, and we are only starting to get equipped to face them. 

The biggest drama of the past century was arguably caused by the two world conflicts and the subsequent transition to nuclear warfare: humanity had to learn to coexist with the impending threat of global annihilation by thermonuclear war. But today, in addition to that dreadful scenario there are now others we have to cope with.
While I was busy reporting the talks at the "Neutrino Telescope"  conference in Venice, LHCb released a startling new result, which I have not much time to describe in much detail this evening (it's Friday evening here in Italy and I'm going to call the week off), and yet wish to share with you as soon as possible.
The spectroscopy of low- and intermediate-mass hadrons (whatever this means) is a complex topic which either enthuses particle physicists or bores them to death. There are two reasons for this dycothomic behaviour.
This is to mention several interesting articles summarizing the presentations given today at the Neutrino Telescopes conference in Venice:
Gravitational Waves: a New Era in Astrophysics Has Begun- A Neutrino Platform
- Overview of the DUNE Experiment
- Poster summary: Neutrino masses and ordering via multimessenger astronomy
The first day of the Neutrino Telescopes XVII conference in Venice is over, and I would like to point you to some short summaries that I published for the conference blog, at http://neutel11.wordpress.com. 
Specifically:


- a summary of the talk on Super-Kamiokande
- a summary of the talk on SNO
- a summary of the talk on KamLAND
- a summary of the talk on K2K and T2K
- a summary of the talk on Daya Bay

You might have noticed that the above experiments were recipients of the 2016 Breakthrough prize in physics. In fact, the session was specifically focusing on these experiments for that reason.