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The ATLAS Top Production Asymmetry And One Thing I Do Not Like Of It

ATLAS sent today to the Cornell arxiv and to the journal JHEP their latest measurement of the top...

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This blog - which, in different sites, has been online since 2005, hence for over 10 years now...

Reviews In Physics - A New Journal

The publishing giant Elsevier is about to launch a new journal, Reviews in Physics. This will be...

The Plot Of The Week: CMS Search For Majorana Neutrinos

The CMS collaboration has released yesterday results of a search for Majorana neutrinos in dimuon...

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Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

I am an experimental particle physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN. In my spare time I play chess, abuse the piano, and aim my dobson telescope at faint galaxies.... Read More »

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"Fermilab has very actively tried to scoop us by press release, even though their uncertainties are under serious challenge and they knew our measurements even before they released theirs."

Michael Riordan, a member to the Mark II collaboration, in an interview by David Perlman on the San Francisco Chronicle, July 21st 1989
At the workshop I attended last week ("Publish, blog, tweet - furthering one's career in science") I discussed blogging for a researcher. One of the points I made was that through a blog a researcher may sometimes ask for the help of his or her readers, with usually great results.

Today I would like to put my own creed to the test, because I am searching for an article and I have no idea how to do it - usual searches with Google are insuccessful in this case. It is a newspaper article of 1989, which I need as it has relevance for a chapter of the book I have been writing.
Last Thursday and Friday I attended a workshop aimed at students of science communication and researchers who want to use the web tools to improve their collaboration networks and the visibility of their scientific output.

I gave a talk discussing the good and the bad sides of blogging about one's research. My contribution was very well received and I received great feedback from the organizers. You can find a live streaming (with the slides I am discussing also shown) at the workshop site, here: http://www.scicomm.it/p/blog-page_1.html . To see my talk go to h.mm.ss 1.17.00 .

UPDATE: the raw videos are now here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBmlEGOgCPEhQFRFw-cwf2qZG7oTsia-r
Today and tomorrow I am attending a workshop in Padova titled as per the title above (but it is in Italian). If you know the language and are interested in the topic, there is available live streaming at the workshop's site, here: http://www.scicomm.it/p/pbt-2014.html

My contribution will be titled "The researcher who blogs: social value, opportunities, challenges, anathemas". I am speaking tomorrow at 10AM (Rome time zone - it's 1AM in California!). I will post some extract of my slides in the blog later on...

The workshop should be interesting, as many reknowned science popularization operators are present, and the topics in the agenda are attractive. Give it a look if you like...
I wonder how interesting can be to an outsider to learn that the mass of the sixth quark is now known to 0.38% accuracy, thanks to the combination of measurements of that quantity performed by the CMS experiment at CERN. In fact, the previously best measurement was the one recently published by the DZERO collaboration at Fermilab, which has a relative 0.43% accuracy. "So what" - you might say - "this 14% improvement does not change my life". That's undeniably true.
Sense About Science is a non-profit organization that campaigns in favour of more correct diffusion and use of scientific information. It is a great attempt at increasing the quality of the scientific information in circulation, focusing on evidence and debunking false claims. The web site of the organization explains: