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How To Make Cancer Drugs More Affordable - Mix Naivete And Someone Else's Money

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Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0® in 2006 and, since July of 2015, the President of the American Council on Science and Health..

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The HRP-4C from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan, a descendant of the HRP-4 humanoid robot that sent normal people into uncanny valley creepiness territory last year, can sing now.

Clearly catering toward Japanese men, this new fembot is a waif-like 5'2", looks really, really young and likely will have lasers or at least Vulcan cannons that come out of her arms in future models - you know, for fighting off the vampires who will be resurrected after an atomic apocalypse in the future that happens in every Japanese story these days.  
Courtesy of GrrrlScientist at Guardian Blogs (who I found courtesy of the venerable yet still awesome ScienceURLs), I got a chance to view an interview of Richard Dawkins conducted by Matt Ridley.   Dawkins is a polarizing figure and maybe not a great public face for people who just want to do positive science outreach but when he stays on message there's really no one better.

Actor Harrison Ford, and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner (and Science 2.0 favorite) Dr. Edward O. Wilson are holding a press conference today at 3:30 in Palo Alto, California, to announce the newly created PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award.    I won't be there because the award has nothing at all to do with actual science outreach but I am mentioning it just the same.

The American Chemical Society is not new to disliking New Media - like all businesses, they would like to be self-perpetuating and that means people have to give them money for memberships and get a magazine for free which means getting quality without paying would be very bad for their income.
Amelia Carolina Sparavigna in the department of physics of  Politecnico di Torino says she has discovered geoglyphs, essentially earthwork graphic designs carved into the landscape, near Lake Titicaca is in the Andes Mountains on the border of Peru and Bolivia.

And she did it using Google.

You may not be able to see it so clearly but time and wear would certainly have made geoglyphs less obvious, though how and why anyone would have made them is also not obvious - unless they were insuring some deity or another could see something more interesting than farmers when they looked down.
When thousands of e-mails were obtained from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK, last year, global warming skeptics jumped all over the documents for signs that researchers had manipulated data.

They hadn't (though their efforts to prevent anyone from obtaining the data, and the blowback from that, were as much cause for concern as the way in which hackers obtained them) but some of the e-mails discussed a different problem:
a CRU employee named "Harry", who often wrote of his wrestling matches with wonky computer software.