Banner
1840s Shipwreck Leads To Important Beer Science Discovery

The Paleo diet is all made up, organic food just accepts one kind of genetic modification in its...

Celiac Disease Is Real - Gluten Sensitivity, Not So Much

It's no surprise that the authors of a study, whose work is spun by people selling diet fads into...

How Mr. Spock Changed Our Perception Of Science

In 1966, when the "Star Trek" television show debuted, it was revolutionary - not just in the ways...

The Real Meaning Of The Blue Black White Gold Dress

A dress that seems to be different colors to different people has all the Internet intrigued -...

User picture.
picture for Fred Phillipspicture for Josh Bloompicture for Matthew Lazenkapicture for Alex Alanizpicture for Luis Gonzalez-Mestrespicture for David Halliday
Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0®.

A wise man once said Darwin had the greatest idea anyone ever had. Others may prefer Newton or Archimedes. Probably no one ever said the WWW or Science... Read More »

Blogroll
Remote access ... for lab equipment?   

 Labshare Australia wants to create a shared network of remote laboratories.  Yep, with costs going up - and science and hospitals are two of very few industries where competition drives costs up, because if Lab X has a new machine, Lab Y may need one to be competitive - while there is current laboratory utilization at less than 10% (they say - things are quiet in Australia?), a group of technology initiatives have joined together to lower some maintenance costs while improving access among students and researchers in labs that have less funding.
It's no secret we have done things our own way here - no marketing, no corporate hierarchy, no political or cultural litmus test and no requirement that you already be popular before you can join.

The big net of Science 2.0 is exactly what some people in science resent about it.    ScientificBlogging is one crucial part of the Science 2.0 experiment but it's not the only part.    Therefore it can be a threat to people who regard science communication as part of their fiefdom, either corporate or perceptual.   Basically, a way for them to make money and control the message.
The big war in science during this decade has not been Republicans against human embryonic stem cell research or Democrats against agriculture, it has instead been open access publishing versus subscription peer-reviewed journals.

Open access publishing of science results, freely available to all, would clearly kill subscription-based peer-reviewed journals.  Right now, those peer reviewed journals are terrifically profitable for multiple companies despite the fact that everyone is saying print is dead.   These companies add value to researchers, they say, by having a higher impact than other companies that do less marketing, etc.
The BP oil spill in the Gulf is doing unmeasurable damage to the local economy and ecology of the region.   Are government efforts geared toward making undersea oil extraction safer or cleaning up the damage done?

Not really.   Pres. Obama's BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Commission instead seems primarily focused on ending America's "addiction to oil" and a disaster like this is a heel-clickingly delightful way to frame the debate to advance that agenda.  
If you've watched any World Cup matches at all (and statistically, if you have not, you are not reading this article) you have been aware of an omnipresent drone in the background - and you might believe it is the biggest swarm of mutant bees you ever imagined or perhaps South Africa's revenge for Apartheid-based boycotts in the 1980s.  

Instead, it is a horn South African fans like to use.  They call it a vuvuzela - I call it a B flat plastic trumpet from hell.   And I am not alone.   
In team sports it is often difficult to determine the value of an individual.   Some sports can do it easily enough, like baseball(1) or basketball, but during the World Cup, casual fans who hear commentators talk about the quality 'form' of a player are lost when the game is 0-0.

Jordi Duch, Joshua S. Waitzman and Luís A. Nunes Amaral of Northwestern University say they may have an answer.