Thanksgiving Science 2015

In the mood for some science on Thanksgiving? Me too, science is the one thing that has not...

Poll Averaging Was No More Accurate In 2012 Than It Is Now

In 2012, the enthusiasm for poll averaging reached a fever pitch. Very few people were critical...

Fossil Fuel Divestment: An Intellectual Placebo For The Wealthy College Near You

“Here’s my bet: the kids are going to win and when they do, it’s going to matter,” prophesized...

Would Shoppers Be Happy If They Know Organic Trade Groups Use Member Fees For Hate Speech?

Organic food has managed to wrap itself in both a health and ethical halo and a lot of the credit...

User picture.
picture for Robert H Olleypicture for Bente Lilja Byepicture for Norm Bensonpicture for Josh Bloompicture for Ignatius Bradypicture for Georg von Hippel
Hank CampbellRSS Feed of this column.

I'm the founder of Science 2.0® in 2006 and, since July of 2015, the President of the American Council on Science and Health.

Revolutionizing... Read More »

I don't have a Kindle or any other e-reader.  It isn't that I am a Luddite, and it isn't that I wouldn't prefer something easier to hold than a large, hundred-year old print copy I don't want to ruin - it's mostly that online books are costly, I only get a 'license' to read them, the resolution is far lower than what eyes can see and, most of all, there is no enhanced value to compensate for any of the other shortcomings.
The HRP-4C from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan, a descendant of the HRP-4 humanoid robot that sent normal people into uncanny valley creepiness territory last year, can sing now.

Clearly catering toward Japanese men, this new fembot is a waif-like 5'2", looks really, really young and likely will have lasers or at least Vulcan cannons that come out of her arms in future models - you know, for fighting off the vampires who will be resurrected after an atomic apocalypse in the future that happens in every Japanese story these days.  
Courtesy of GrrrlScientist at Guardian Blogs (who I found courtesy of the venerable yet still awesome ScienceURLs), I got a chance to view an interview of Richard Dawkins conducted by Matt Ridley.   Dawkins is a polarizing figure and maybe not a great public face for people who just want to do positive science outreach but when he stays on message there's really no one better.

Actor Harrison Ford, and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner (and Science 2.0 favorite) Dr. Edward O. Wilson are holding a press conference today at 3:30 in Palo Alto, California, to announce the newly created PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award.    I won't be there because the award has nothing at all to do with actual science outreach but I am mentioning it just the same.

The American Chemical Society is not new to disliking New Media - like all businesses, they would like to be self-perpetuating and that means people have to give them money for memberships and get a magazine for free which means getting quality without paying would be very bad for their income.
Amelia Carolina Sparavigna in the department of physics of  Politecnico di Torino says she has discovered geoglyphs, essentially earthwork graphic designs carved into the landscape, near Lake Titicaca is in the Andes Mountains on the border of Peru and Bolivia.

And she did it using Google.

You may not be able to see it so clearly but time and wear would certainly have made geoglyphs less obvious, though how and why anyone would have made them is also not obvious - unless they were insuring some deity or another could see something more interesting than farmers when they looked down.