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The Five Stages Of A Dying Theory

I am told that when a patient is diagnosed with a terminal illness, he or she will likely go through...

Anomaly! Book Presentation At CERN On November 29

The book "Anomaly! Collider physics and the quest for new phenomena at Fermilab" is about to be...

Vector Boson Scattering: ATLAS Tests SM Unitarity

A new paper by the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider produces results in good...

A Colloquium At Northwestern

Back to my office in Padova, I am looking back at last week's travel around the US and the two...

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Tommaso DorigoRSS Feed of this column.

I am an experimental particle physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN. In my spare time I play chess, abuse the piano, and aim my dobson telescope at faint galaxies.... Read More »

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This might become the title of a series of posts, much like my "say of the week" series. In fact, the Large Hadron Collider is back in operation since earlier this month, and the instantaneous luminosity at which it collides protons at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is going to keep gradually increasing, as better orbit parameters are found, more protons are injected in the machine, more bunches are made to circulate, and beams are squeezed in the surroundings of the experimental halls.

Still, it feels nice to report that the value of L = 2.4E32 cm^-2 s^-1 has been now achieved, a full 20% more than the highest number recorded in the 2010 running.
The CDF collaboration sent to the preprint arxiv a new paper a few days ago. In it, they report on a measurement of the mass difference of top and anti-top quarks. The result would not be worth discussing in detail, if it did not show a 2-sigma discrepancy which might be the first hint of a CPT violation. So let me discuss it here.
My blogging output here is scarce this week, because I am spending my time at the NEUTEL 2011 conference in Venice. I am producing some posts summarizing the talks I hear at the conference, together with a few colleagues. Our blog there will be short-lived, but already collects about 1000 views a day, growing by the day. Here is a selection of recent posts you can find -I only list here those published today or yesterday:

The NEUTEL 2011 conference started today in Venice. Many experiments in neutrino physics will be reporting new results there, and the interest is of course high in the community. Along with a few vailant physicists from my university, I will be blogging form the site, trying to cover all the important new information as well as some other information in general. So please visit the NEUTEL11 blog to learn the latest news on neutrino physics... Already there is a report on a general overview of neutrino oscillations by Art McDonald, among with additional posts on HEP results.

... Not really.

What startled me most was that a colleague of mine at the University of Padova even sent a message to my departments' mailing list, saying that the new result is very important. But it clearly isn't! In fact, the exclusion at 95% CL in the range of Higgs boson masses that CDF and DZERO could put together from the analysis of additional data is almost exactly the same as the one that they published last Summer.

But maybe I should make a step back and explain the matter from the start, to let you judge by yourself the relevance of the new Tevatron bounds on the rate of Higgs boson production in proton-antiproton collisions.

CDF and DZERO are analyzing the proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV that the Tevatron collider is producing since 2001.

Neutrino phyisics may be boring, as Jester claims in a post today at the NEUTEL11 blog, or exciting, as many others are ready to testify. And since Jester talks about exciting new results ready to be submitted by the XENON100 collaboration, I would bet you will concur with the latter.